POST CARDS FROM HOME

by Theperfectbeachbum

Located in the West Indies in the Caribbean Sea, at the southern end of the Grenadines island chain, Grenada, known as the Island of Spice, sits north of the Venezuelan coast and is comprised of Grenada, Carriacou, Petite Martinique and smaller islands.

It’s an independent, English-speaking country whose history is an intriguing mix of South America and English, with a splash of French thrown in. The official language is English, but your ears with be teased with Grenadian Creole English and French.

Remnants of one of the island plantations

Grenada is called, “The Spice Island” because it is the world’s largest exporter of nutmeg and mace. For just a one-dollar tour, go to the Gouyave Nutmeg Factory and the Grenada Co-operative Nutmeg Association to see the entire production process, including the sorting, drying, weighing and packaging areas. Of course, there is a gift shop selling all things nutmeg.

Grenada is renowned for its local cuisine, which is a delicious mixture of native Carib Amerindian, East Indian and French. The Spanish custom of tapas is present on menus as well.

The “Oil Down” is considered the national dish. This recipe contains a mixture of salted pigtail, pig feet, salt beef or chicken, dumplings made from flour, plus side dishes of breadfruit, green banana, yam and potatoes cooked in coconut milk and oil.

Native islanders dress in national colors.
Native islanders dress in national colors.

Most of the island is blanketed with jungle and rainforests, bordered by white sand and black volcanic beaches, with Grand Anse Beach listed on most of the world’s greatest lists of beautiful beaches.

For the hiker and naturalists, you will want to make the journey to Grand Etang National Park. There are waterfalls, hiking trails up Mount Qua Qua, and a large population of Mona monkeys. Any direction you go on the island, however, will lead you to lush foliage and dense rain forests.

Near to St. George’s is a beautiful private home and garden known as Grenadian Gardens. In addition to Grenadian Gardens, Morne Fendue and Bay Gardens are beautiful private homes and gardens to visit. Belmont Estate and Douglas Stone Estate are both 300-year-old plantations. There are several other private homes and old plantations that open their doors to visitors for a small fee.

The currency used is the East Caribbean Dollar with an exchange rate of $2.70 to the U.S. dollar.

Direct flights depart daily from New York, Miami and Atlanta. If you’re tired of the same old ports of call, make sure your next ship sails to Grenada.

Most of the island is blanketed with jungle and rainforests, bordered by white sandy and black volcanic beaches, with Grand Anse Beach listed on most of the world’s greatest lists of beautiful beaches.

Most people are introduced to Grenada through its capital city, St. George’s, where cruise ships dock. Overlooking the city and port is 300-year-old Fort George, with a spectacular view of the city and harbour.

“The Spice Island” is the world’s largest exporter of nutmeg and mace.

The majority people of Grenada are of African descent.

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